Notes from the LinkedIn Field

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The field of LinkedIn.com search is currently, unfortunately, full of bugs. Following up on and expanding my last post, here are some observations. Often, results do not include some or all of the 3rd level connections. It seems random to me; any insights from the analytical minds are welcome! Sometimes, NOT is not respected. This search for cats not dogs …

LinkedIn Boolean Is Crazy

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Searching on LinkedIn costs many Recruiters low self-esteem. When you see results you did not expect, you may blame yourself for searching “the wrong way.” But it is rarely the case. What has been happening on LinkedIn and LinkedIn Recruiter (LIR) lately is beyond my (reasonably high) IQ. Let us compare some searches on LinkedIn.com and in LIR. We vaguely …

Big Data for Executive Search

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  Research is a vital part of executive search. You need to be knowledgeable about the industry, the candidate’s background, and the role at your company. You need to find their contact info. Here are some resources to help you with gathering intelligence. This document has ~4K consultants’ contacts and a comprehensive overview of consulting companies Cxoreach.com is a scrapable database …

Change Your Thinking, Rewrite Your Search Strings

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Successful Sourcers know the main – secret! – principle of productive search: “Imagine the words and phrases exactly as they should appear in the target results. Then, use those words and phrases in your search”. We also call it “Visualize Success”. Rarely do Recruiters get training in the “Visualize Success” skill, yet it is the #1 factor in finding target …

How to Clean Up CSV Export

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As Sourcers, we have to work with exported data. LinkedIn Recruiter, Instant Data Scraper, and other scraping tools provide export to CSV with the wrong coding, that may look like this: Looks familiar? Here is how to straighten it out (thanks to David Galley for the tip!) Step 1. Open a new Excel file and choose Data/From Text/CSV: Upload the …

The US vs Europe: Cultural Differences

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I recently gave a private training which included an overview of cultural differences. I thoroughly enjoyed it! I moved to the US from Russia in 1991, having received a three-month contract as a Mac Developer at the Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute in San Francisco. They converted it to a full-time position midway and helped me obtain a Green Card, at …

Whom to Follow

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Speakers and Sourcers David Galley (US) Glenn Gutmacher (US) Aaron Lintz (US) Andre Bradshaw (US) Glen Cathey (US) Guillaume Alexander (France) Victor Soroka (Ukraine) Balazs Paroczay (Hungary) Hung Lee (UK) Vanessa Raath (South Africa) Josef Kadlec (Czech Republic) Юлия Кузмане (Russia) Bas Westland (Netherlands) Marcel Van Der Meer (Голландия) Best sourcing conference by Phil Tusing – Sourcing Summit https://sourcingsummit.net/sosutech/register/#av-layout-grid-1 Best …

Sourcers vs. Recruiters: I Have Changed My Mind

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When I started sourcing and teaching sourcing, I believed that Sourcers should be separate. Sourcers are nerdy, introverted, and know the technologies. (As an introvert, I get tired after speaking with two or three people, then need down time.) Making Sourcers reach out to potential candidates is not utilizing their top skills. Recruiters are good communicators, extroverted, friendly, and outgoing. …

Asterisk * vs. AROUND(X) on Google

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Both the Asterisk * and AROUND(X) are proximity operators on Google and provide their own benefits. The Asterisk stands for one word or a few shorter words. “<keyword1> * <keyword2>” will find phrases where the keywords are close together. Example, exploring company email formats: site:rocketreach.co “being used * of the time” Using more Asterisks will find phrases where the keywords …

Can You X-Ray for Profiles? A Simple Test

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Can you X-Ray for profiles on LinkedIn, XING, Facebook, Instagram, Github, Stackoverflow, Meetup, Behance, Quora, Slack, Discord, Snapchat, VK, Slideshare, CrunchBase, etc.? There is a simple way to find out. Public profiles uniformly have members’ names in the page titles. Pick a common name like Jim Smith or Mary Jones, use it with the intitle: operator and combine with site:<site.com>. …