LinkedIn Profile SEO: How to Be Found

booleanstrings Boolean Leave a Comment

Based on my experience sourcing on LinkedIn, here is a list of profile hacks. To be found more often, both on LinkedIn and LinkedIn Recruiter, do this: When you enter your data, follow prompts and selections – do not enter unusually spelled names Use your industry, not your company’s Your companies should point to company pages on LinkedIn; same for …

Why Step Outside of LinkedIn Recruiter?

booleanstrings Boolean Leave a Comment

I have just finished a project sourcing iOS Developers across Europe who got top grades at school. It turns out, LinkedIn Recruiter (LIR) does not search in the grades! I couldn’t search by “first class”, “distinction”, “honours”, 2:1, etc. Reporting the issue resulted in Support predictably asking me whether I cleaned the cookies and use an outdated browser. A Message …

Googling for Invisible Words

booleanstrings Boolean 8 Comments

Sometimes, Google indexes words from the pages’ source code that do not appear on pages. This includes the alt tag, dd tag, and a few other cases. Here are some practical search examples. You can utilize the hidden-but-found words well in LinkedIn X-Ray! Find LinkedIn members by job location. (This is not possible on LinkedIn, even in keywords). site:linkedin.com “work …

X-Ray Mastery

booleanstrings Boolean, Google, OSINT Leave a Comment

We are lucky that Google keeps supporting its 21 advanced search operators even though most of its users never use the operators (and those who do rarely click on ads). As it is getting harder to search, particularly for requirements such as Diversity with no search filters provided by Social Networks, scraping and automation are becoming must-have skills for Sourcers. …

LinkedIn.com People Search Anti-Improvements

booleanstrings Boolean, LinkedIn 2 Comments

[Edited] Phew! They have fixed it. It might have happened due to me filing an issue – once my message was communicated to Developers, the behavior went away in a few hours. Interacting with @LinkedInHelp is not for the faint of heart – they asked me whether I know about Boolean search and sent me to read the help article, …

The Future of Sourcing Is Technical (Scraping and Automation)

booleanstrings Boolean 7 Comments

I think that Talent Sourcing will become more technical. We will have to use scraping and automation to stay productive and competitive. (This is not advice on scraping or automating work on any site in legal terms, of course.) Scraping I anticipate the increased necessity for scraping due to: 1) Growing demand to source for diversity combined with the limitations …

Three Ways to X-Ray LinkedIn for Diversity

booleanstrings Boolean 1 Comment

You can search for Diversity candidates on LinkedIn using first names, pronouns, organizations, education (including Alumni search), group memberships, associations, employers (for veterans), and other ways. X-Raying on Google can complement your sourcing process. Search for ethnic names with accented characters Google can search for accented characters; LinkedIn ignores them. As an example, you can Google for Hispanic/Latino names such …

Google Strings vs. Boolean Strings

booleanstrings Boolean 2 Comments

(Can I please ask you to read to the end?) It has eventually become such a mismatch in terminology. Most people in our industry refer to search strings on Google as “Boolean Strings”. However, the term “Boolean”, meaning AND, OR, and NOT, no longer applies to Google search best practices, and less so every day. Practical Google search strings do …

The Advantages of the “Wrong Password” on LinkedIn #OSINT

booleanstrings Boolean 1 Comment

  A more descriptive title of this post could be “Hack: Check Whether an Email Address or Phone Number is Registered on LinkedIn in 5 Seconds or Less”. The “hack” does not reveal which member it is – it only returns a Yes/No answer. But it is a validation pointer for the contact phone number or email address you are …

How (and Why) to Grow Your LinkedIn Network Overnight

booleanstrings Boolean 2 Comments

In 2006, Christian Mayaud came up with a genius idea of LIONs – LinkedIn Open Networks. There was no connection limit; you could see the exact numbers of connections on profiles and the 4th level connections. But then, as now, people outside of your network were “invisible,” shown in search as “LinkedIn Member” with no details – and you were …