Creating Real-Time Mini-People-Aggregators

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It sounds sexy to Source without LinkedIn – and it should. One can do some exciting things outside of LinkedIn. However, you need to know quite a bit about people’s professional history to consider them potential candidates. Where else, except LinkedIn (or job boards, which have been deserted lately,) can you find someone’s job title, company, how long they have …

More About the Source and the Topic

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Over the last two years, Google has enhanced the display of additional knowledge around search results. This post is to bring the feature to your attention. It aids in researching topics or sites. For now, it works only in US/English searches. Press on the three dots by a Google search result to discover: “More about this source” It is useful …

Repeat After Me (Give Keywords Weights in Google)

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It was not the case 10-15 years ago, but now, Google pays attention if you repeat a keyword or a key phrase. Repeating, in theory, should not be necessary; you would expect the same results if Google followed formal Boolean logic and displayed “all” results. However, Google puts some informal “thinking” into the string interpretation, so: If you repeat a …

You Are Missing 570MLN+ LinkedIn Members, 12M+ Open To Work

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In our training, we look into restrictive search filters on LinkedIn and LinkedIn Recruiter. Some restrictions come from members with “shallow” profiles; many (such as seniority, function, or company size) are there because LinkedIn cannot interpret some of its data correctly. If you use LinkedIn Recruiter, you likely search by years of experience. But have you tried searching for any years …

Raise inanchor: Sail to LinkedIn Locations, Titles, and Schools

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Guest Post from Talent Sourcer Mike Santoro This post is Part 2 of another post that featured the helpful discovery that Google’s inanchor: operator will search LinkedIn Headline text through X-Ray search. You can read Part 1 here: Sink Into LinkedIn Headlines Tie inanchor: To Your Strings. Part 2 – X-Raying LinkedIn with inanchor: will search more than just LinkedIn …

Sink Into LinkedIn Headlines – Tie inanchor: To Your Strings

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Guest Post from Talent Sourcer Mike Santoro How to Search Linkedin Profile Headlines with X-Ray You won’t find a “Headline Search Field” option in LinkedIn Recruiter, LinkedIn Sales Navigator, LinkedIn Recruiter Lite, or Linkedin.com Basic Search. Isn’t that strange? ( Yes).  Irina shared a headline search tip (first discovered by Aaron Lintz) in her Facebook Group Boolean Strings, the Internet …

LinkedIn Does Not Understand Its Data (and a Conference May 31 – June 3)

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When your requisition asks for a Bachelor’s degree, do you use the Degree filter in LinkedIn Recruiter? I used to but have now stopped. When you search for Bachelor’s, LinkedIn misses profiles like this: Here is what happens: LinkedIn has allowed members to enter their data in a relatively “free-form” format, but it fails to interpret the data correctly. It …

Finding Contacts via Custom Search Engines

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Google Custom Search Engines (CSEs)add much power to Google search. Based on Schema.org object definitions, sites can “tell” Googlebot that they have objects, like a Person object. The definition of a Person has tons of fields, but sites usually implement only some. CSEs can pull sites with “Persons” and narrow down to the presence of some fields or their values. …

Search Is Broken on LinkedIn – NOT, AND

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What is going on here? The operator NOT did not exclude – even highlighted – the word “recruitment.” I started running into this phenomenon a few weeks ago, but the output seemed random: sometimes, NOT was acknowledged, sometimes, ignored. Then I saw weird results without the NOT, but the NOT “deficiencies” was easier to illustrate on social media. My share …

How I Read Your Resume: a US Recruiter Notes

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Guest post from Julia Tverskaya Your resume provides that all-important first impression. Writing a good resume is not simple. It can and should take several hours or even several days. But the effort pays off. The purposes of the resume are: 1) to be selected for an interview; 2) to provide a conversation starter during the interviews. Everything you put …